Workshops & Panels

Workshops repeat two times during the day. The first session is at 11:15 am, the second begins approximately 2:00 pm.  Workshops/panels run for one hour, 15 minutes.  The full agenda can be found on the homepage.

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Legislators’ Roundtable

Beekeeping 101

Strategies for Facilitating Access to Farmland

Let’s Bridge the Gap – Transitioning Business Ownership

Farm to Chef Success

Where Will Future Farmers Come From?

Engaging the Community in Agriculture  

HARVEST Workshop

Children’s Programming

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Beekeeping 101

Maggie Browne - Honey Pot Apiary

Bees are “eusocial” insects that are fascinating and directly beneficial to the environment.  Beekeeping is an engaging and highly rewarding experience that requires commitment and flexibility. This workshop will introduce the fundamentals of honey bee (apis mellifera) biology and will focus on colony biology, hive equipment, hive products, what’s happening now to the honey bee, suggestions for supporting honey bee health, and resources for learning more about bees and beekeeping.   Read more about Maggie

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Strategies for Facilitating Access to Farmland

Marissa CodeyColumbia Land Conservancy
Jim Oldham - Equity Trust

Marissa and Jim will talk about farmland-access strategies that are used by conservation organizations. Marissa will describe how the Conservancy helps make farmland available to farmers through its Farmer Landowner Match and Conserve a Local Farm programs, as well as how farmland can be permanently protected from non-agricultural development. Jim will talk about several new and innovative tools that can further ensure that farmland remains available and accessible to farmers, to include tools like ground leases, affirmative farming clauses, and provisions requiring that certain farmland be sold only to qualified farmers.   Read more about Melissa and Jim 

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Let’s Bridge the Gap – Transitioning Business Ownership

Emili PonteFarm Credit East, ACA
Bill MartinFarm Credit East

The Hudson Valley is at its peak for farm-business ownership opportunities. There are farmers looking to make a lifestyle change, there are next generations eager to take over a family-farm operation, and there is a new wave of farmers looking for farming opportunities.

This workshop will examine useful models for transitioning business ownership to the next generation, highlighting the trust and respect that’s needed between the generations to make a successful transition. It will provide focal points for both current and future owners of a farm business that will help make the transition a win-win situation for all.

Envision the options for the next chapter of your farming story, and hear how other farmers have navigated this process—with success.   Read more about Emili and Bill

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Farm to Chef Success

Proprietor Nancy Thomas, Mezze Bistro + Bar and Allium 
Chef Owner Serge Madikians, Serevan Restaurant
Executive Chef Hugh Horner,  The Restaurant at Helsinki Hudson
Katie Bogdanffy - Third generation farmer and founder of Yellow Bell Farm
John Brusie, Vice President, Operations Ginsberg’s Foods

The trend in farm-to-table eateries continues to grow in our region. New restaurants open up every season, and a growing number of chefs want to connect with farmers and use locally grown products. This market potential can help farmers and restaurants better connect. With more business relationships between the two business types, customers are afforded more local-food options. This panel, moderated by John Brusie of Ginsberg’s Foods, features a local farmer plus representatives from three farm-to-table restaurants.

If you are a farmer interested in selling to restaurants, a chef wanting to increase your local-food menu options, a restaurant owner looking to showcase local farm connections, or a foodie seeking out new places to eat, you’ll want to join this conversation.

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Where Will Future Farmers Come From?

Amanda Benson – Cornell Cooperative Extension
Karen Davenport Agricultural Science and Technology teacher and department chair, Housatonic Valley Regional High School, and co-owner and operator of Tollgate Farm in Ancramdale, NY 

Practitioners will tell you farming is hard work, but they’re also quick to say how immensely rewarding it can be. Nevertheless, for some decades we saw a sharp decline in the numbers of young people embarking on farming careers. But there’s good news, because that may be changing. Now, farming is capturing the interest of people in their 20s. Now, we have an opportunity to engage the imaginations of people even younger, to inspire them to consider becoming farmers or getting involved in some form of agriculture. Now, how can we do that?

Housatonic Valley Regional High School, in Connecticut, is a petri dish of sorts in which Karen Davenport engages her students to learn about agriculture. At the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Columbia and Greene Counties, Extension Educator Amanda Benson’s youth programs are helping to increase agricultural literacy amongst school-aged children while they demonstrate to her young charges the rich promise that being a farmer holds.

Engaging the Community in Agriculture

For farming to be sustained there must be a pro-agriculture culture in the community.  To attain this, residents need to be engaged in discussions and decision making and there must be an environment of trust and transparency.

During this session, panelists will discuss how their projects are effectively mobilizing community residents and elected officials to develop strategic action plans that strengthen and enhance farming, provide everyone access to healthy food and preserve community character and the natural environment.

Moderator:  Virginia Kasinki, Director Community Based Programs, Glynwood, Inc.

Panelists:

Jennifer Munoz, Growing Healthy Garden Program Manager, Member of Keep Berkshires Farming (North Berkshire)

Jennifer will be speaking about the Keep Berkshire Farming community assessment process, and how the findings will be used to inform the plans for “next steps”.

Shanna BarneyTransportation Coordinator for Northeast Dutchess Transit and Community Food Assessment Project Researcher, North East Community Center

Betsey McCall, Farm and Food Program Director, 7th & 8th Grade After School Coordinator, North East Community Center

Shanna and Betsey will be discussing the North East Community Center’s farm and food programs, including the Millerton Farmer’s Market and Summer Food Service Program, and how those programs led to the undertaking of a Community Food Security Assessment and Planning Project.

Rachel Kelly, Copake resident

Rachel will be speaking about her participation, as a community member, with the Copake Agricultural Center, a 122 acre parcel of farmland in the Town of Copake.

HARVEST Club workshop (Offered at 11:15 only)

This year’s HARVEST Club workshop will provide a brief history of the club, an overview of this year’s projects (including the market lamb project). One talk on the effects of the polled gene on dairy cattle production, reproduction, and growth, and another talk on a hydroponic dirt growing system. An explanation of the club’s bee project, followed by a Q&A session will wrap it up.

*This workshop will be offered at 11:15 AM, and will not repeat at 2 PM.

 

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